Growth

How Swiss private banks can reignite growth

Swiss private banks have been on the defensive for a decade. We think the time has come to go on offense through commercially-driven transformation. By focusing on their strengths, and partnering for their non-core activities, Swiss private banks have a real opportunity to maximize value and grow again.
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Skilled labor shortage: Swiss CEOs optimistic on an international comparison

Which talents are needed and how can companies ensure that they have these experts on board in the near future? The majority of CEOs surveyed abroad for the KPMG CEO Outlook expect about 5 percent of positions in their companies will be lost to automation within the next three years. Swiss CEOs are much less gloomy and find this scenario rather implausible.
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The 5 most challenging trends for Swiss private bankers

10 percent of private banks did not survive 2015. KPMG’s joint study with the University of St. Gallen finds that many banks’ efforts to adapt their business and operating models to the new environment have proven insufficient. Despite trying to turn around their performances, many banks face a stark reality - they can’t survive.
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CEO Outlook: Strategic cornerstones of CEOs in Switzerland

In a global survey, KPMG asked the opinion of 1,200 CEOs, of which 50 are based in Switzerland. In regard to their most pressing issues in the coming years, there are some clear indications where the journey might be going. Swiss CEOs would like to speed up their go-to-market processes for products and services.
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CEO Outlook: The Swiss economy looks set to keep growing

In a global KPMG study surveying 1,200 CEOs worldwide, Swiss CEOs see the future of their companies in a more positive light than the international average. 66 percent of Swiss business leaders believe their companies will experience growth over the next three years, whilst the international average is at 47 percent.
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Insurance groups take a portfolio approach to growth

In today’s insurance environment, victory belongs to the bold. Margins are under pressure and competition is heating up; insurers can no longer afford to ‘sit’ on businesses that are underperforming or subscale.
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